Talking to Our Children About Pornography

Recently, I chaperoned my daughter’s elementary school field trip to the art museum in town. On the permission slip to the event, there was a disclaimer about nude sculptures and paintings in the museum and a warning of the possible dreadful opportunity for the fourth grade children to see such pieces of art. Then, upon arriving at school for art guide duty, all the parent volunteers were taken into a private room for “a talk”. We were told to walk a little ahead of the children in the museum and to make sure there weren’t nudes in the room we were entering. We were also told not to stop at these pieces and to be careful not to talk about them.

I was horrified.

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Podcast Episode #24 – A Family’s Experience with Special Needs

This conversation is extremely helpful to those who are also just starting out on the special needs path. Angelle’s words (and energy) will give you ideas, direction, and a sense of support to hear how one family has navigated their journey.

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Podcast Episode #23 – One Family’s Educational Journey

Listen in on a heartfelt conversation with Angelle. She’s a mom of 3 children, both adopted and biological. Angelle has learned to work with the challenges familiar to most parents of children with special needs.

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Finding My Purpose

Unrolling my mat last night in yoga class, I noticed we had a substitute teacher. I sighed inwardly, a little disturbed that my regular teacher wasn’t there. I felt uncertain, like I didn’t know what I was getting into.

Even though I have been doing yoga for twenty-five years–I even taught years ago–I still consider myself a beginner. I feel like a newbie in every new yoga class I take; yet, I don’t want my yoga instructor to be one. I don’t mean to belittle someone young and excited, but sometimes their insistence in sharing their new yoga discoveries can make class feel cumbersome and, honestly, yield too much talking. Nevertheless, I laid on my mat and resigned myself to do it. After all, I had made it to class after managing to escape the chaos at home.

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Hating Where You Live

I didn’t want to live in Suburbia. I still stand out like a sore thumb, and the PTA ladies probably run the other way when they see me, but I have learned some big lessons. In the past year, I have finally learned that it truly doesn’t matter where you live. You can make any house a home and any neighborhood a community if you choose to do it. You don’t have to hate where you live.

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