Podcast Episode #36 – Gun Violence: Finding Your Mama Bear

Gun Violence, Safety, and Support for Families Finding your Mama Bear is about your perception of safety and doing something. It’s about the need to keep our children safe and how that impacts our nervous systems. Find ways to be proactive – whether that’s pulling your child out of school until the problems are properly Read More


Podcast Episode #35 – Gun Violence as a Collective Trauma

The collective trauma that many Americans have experienced in bearing witness to such tragedies in schools and other public spaces, that either are part of their daily environment or resemble them closely, has caused many people to develop an ongoing defensive stance that can resemble the post-traumatic response of actual trauma survivors. Listen in to learn more about how our nervous systems are responding to this trauma.


Podcast Episode #34 – Gun Violence: Listening to Understand

We’re all scared right now and in that fear, no one is really listening to anyone else. How can we make it different? Why does it matter? We need to start with listening, and not just to the people who agree with us. But we need to find ways to make it safer to have the conversations we need to have and to listen to one another. In this series, we’re going to be looking at what it takes to really listen to understand and another way we can look at what’s happening with the boys and men in our culture that I haven’t seen anyone talking about. Let’s raise our consciousness and work together to help our kids!


In times like these, remember the helpers

I had a really moving conversation with my 12-year-old this afternoon about the Orlando massacre. He was talking about what he’s heard – so much about the person who killed and hurt so many innocent people. He doesn’t understand how someone could kill people because of who they love and he said, “Why are there so many bad people in the world?” I could feel the heaviness in his question. It was in that moment that I realized he is only hearing the bad parts – and there are plenty – in this awful time when many of my friends and clients and loved ones are no longer safe.


Podcast Episode #27 – Emotional Healing After Trauma

My story is about the incredible power of Story Healing and how my family was able to get through a really tough time with the help of this knowledge. I am forever grateful that I was able to help my daughter (and all of us) to heal emotionally from her difficult experience specifically because of the support I received from Rebecca to do this work.


After a Hurricane: What You Can Do to Help Your Family

At one time or another, we’ll all probably experience something big in our lives, whether it is a hurricane, another natural disaster, or something else that wasn’t expected. We don’t have to wait until our children show signs of distress to try to help them. There’s so much we can do as things are happening and immediately after to lessen the impact of those experiences.


Helping Your Kids Through a Hurricane: Thoughts on Irma

How can you help your kids through a hurricane? What can you do in anticipation of the storm, and what can you do once it’s over to make sure your kids (and you) are moving through it in an emotionally healthy way? Read on. I’ve got some important things to share with you that aren’t Read More


Can Everyone Benefit From Story Healing?

It isn’t a miracle cure. It isn’t a quick fix. For most families, it would take about 3 weeks to see a big change in the sleep patterns from using the story telling ideas we’re presenting. Interestingly, it is about the same amount of time that it takes using cry-it-out to change a sleep pattern without the negative consequences to the brain and the relationship.


Better Sleep Through Story Healing

Beata, 2 ½, had always been a restless sleeper. It was a challenge to get her to sleep each night, and once asleep she would burrow herself into the side of one of her parents. She woke up screaming inconsolably from her naps each day and many times at night, as well. Sleep training was something that her parents decided they did not want to do, but Scott and Beth were tired. More than that, they knew that Beata was probably not getting a good night’s sleep, either.


Do we have mistaken ideas about sleep?

It seems that sleep-deprived parents are given two choices: cry- it-out or just wait until they outgrow it. But is there another way? Was my son’s lack of sleep more than just an inconvenience? Was he trying to communicate something to me through his night waking?