Tantrums Aren’t Just for Toddlers

When you have little ones, there is a lot of talk about how “it’s just a phase” and “this too shall pass,” whether it’s about picky eating, tantrums, or some other behavior deemed inappropriate in our society. While it is true that many of those behaviors do pass with time, I definitely wasn’t expecting to still witness full toddler-style tantrums with my child at 8 years old.


Podcast Episode #15 – An Attached Parent for Life

What is a “normal parent”? Can conscious parents look to our current collective culture for attached parent models?

Studies are showing the number of children experiencing healthy emotional attachment are “abysmally low” for a modern and “advanced” society. Is parenting keeping pace with progress?

Parents today need courage to step away from the mainstream practices that are failing to foster healthy attachment.


Podcast Episode #14 – Is Your Parenting Leading to Secure Attachment?

Parents today are being given mixed messages about attachment parenting. With heavy workloads, lack of support, children with high needs, and conflicting parenting advice, many parents feel attachment parenting requires too much of them.

The truth is, responsiveness to stress and upset, and attunement to big emotions builds secure attachment – and this can be created consciously at any age or family stage.


Choosing My Child Over Moms’ Night Out

Moms’ Night Out! A coveted part of many moms’ lives. You get to take a shower, put on some makeup, and wear grown-up clothes. And the best part? You get to talk to grown-ups – and ones you like, for that matter. Here I was in my dress that finally fit me again, babysitter engaged, Read More


The Baby Sheep and Early Patterns

Have you ever noticed something in your life where you have an unexpected reaction? Maybe it’s out of proportion to whatever is happening in the moment. Maybe you suddenly start sobbing in a movie and you didn’t see it coming. Or your child does something and you get completely over the top angry. Yet, as you reflect on it later, you have no idea why you were SO upset about it? I just had the experience of noticing something like this and thought I would share it with you.


Realizations of a Stay-at-Home Mom

I stay home with my kids. I do some different work projects, and I bring in some money, but my main focus is the kids. They’re my #1 job. It’s a struggle for most (all?) moms who are the primary childcare providers to (1) feel like others respect the fact that being a mom is a “real job” and (2) treat themselves as though they work a “real job” while they’re “just” staying home with their kids.


Can Everyone Benefit From Story Healing?

It isn’t a miracle cure. It isn’t a quick fix. For most families, it would take about 3 weeks to see a big change in the sleep patterns from using the story telling ideas we’re presenting. Interestingly, it is about the same amount of time that it takes using cry-it-out to change a sleep pattern without the negative consequences to the brain and the relationship.


Better Sleep Through Story Healing

Beata, 2 ½, had always been a restless sleeper. It was a challenge to get her to sleep each night, and once asleep she would burrow herself into the side of one of her parents. She woke up screaming inconsolably from her naps each day and many times at night, as well. Sleep training was something that her parents decided they did not want to do, but Scott and Beth were tired. More than that, they knew that Beata was probably not getting a good night’s sleep, either.


Do we have mistaken ideas about sleep?

It seems that sleep-deprived parents are given two choices: cry- it-out or just wait until they outgrow it. But is there another way? Was my son’s lack of sleep more than just an inconvenience? Was he trying to communicate something to me through his night waking?


Ignore the behavior, connect with the child

She paused for a moment. This pause was for her. She centered herself around the realization that her child was distressed and this was how he was expressing it in this moment. She wasn’t going to do what he was demanding. That would not be healthy for either of them. But she stopped what she was doing and gave him her full attention. She ignored his behavior in this moment and focused on him, her child, who was clearly having a rough time.


Where do you find your parenting support?

The challenge of being a parent today isn’t a lack of information. In fact, information overload has made parenting more challenging. Especially when you consider that the answers for your family aren’t going to come from the outside, but from within yourself. After all, who knows you and your family better? Sometimes, though, we find ourselves needing some guidance or some suggestions beyond the usual time-outs or other parenting strategies that just don’t seem to be working.

I want my kids to be helpful

My kid won’t help! 5 tips for creating a culture of working together.

“My son refuses to help out. He isn’t very independent. He wants me to do a lot for him and so I do. But I resent it.”

It brought up a great question. How do parents navigate those situations when we need our child to help out without resorting to yelling, hitting, or threatening? How can we consciously parent through it?